Entries Tagged as 'Trends'

4 to Know: My Current Favorite Face Products

4.28.2016

By Kelsey Baska

After a long day of school and work all I want to do is go home and take off my makeup, throw on a face mask, and watch New Girl on Netflix. Recently I’ve discovered some new badass products that make up what I like to call my “Dream Team”. The switch I made for these products is arguably the best decision of my life next to naming my cat after Lizzie McGuire (obviously). I’d love to share these favorites with you all so grab a glass of wine, sit back, and get ready to do some serious online shopping.

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1) Pacifica’s Sea Foam Complete Face Wash This stuff is an absolute dream. My sister is a huge fan of their products because she’s vegan and Pacifica doesn’t test their products on animals or use animal ingredients in their formulations. One day during a regular visit to Ulta she suggested that I try them out. I was totally down because I needed a new face wash anyway and OMG people I am never looking back. This product leaves my face feeling soft and clean. I also love the fact that Pacifica’s products are made with all natural ingredients and that some of their packaging is recyclable.

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2) Garnier Micellar Cleansing Water All-in-1 Waterproof Makeup Remover & Cleanser I used to be obsessed with makeup remover wipes until I realized that our environment doesn’t appreciate them as much as I do. Recently, I discovered this product and I am LIVING for it. It is super gentle on my skin but powerful enough to break down all of my makeup without the need of any harsh scrubbing. Usually if I wear waterproof mascara it takes me forever to get it off but this product makes taking it off an absolute breeze. Plus, it’s only $6.99 so you have no excuses people.

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3) Nivea for Men Sensitive Post Shave Balm Ok, I probably took an unexpected turn and I’m sure some of you are like “WTF Kelsey”. But hear me out; this is the BEST foundation primer ever. Like most of you, I don’t wear makeup every single day because sometimes I honestly don’t feel like putting that shit on. But I work at a restaurant and go to school full time and sometimes I have to leave class and go straight to work. On days like those I have absolutely no time to stop by my apartment to get ready so I need my makeup to last from morning until night. My favorite makeup artist of all time (NikkieTutorials on YouTube) did a review over this product and after watching it I immediately drove to Target to buy it. This product contains the ingredient glycerin which, in a nutshell, makes your makeup stick to your skin and last all damn day. All you have to do is substitute this guy for your normal moisturizer, apply your foundation, and you’re good to go, bebe.

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4) Any Mario Badescu product ever made Next to Pacifica, Mario Badescu has been my favorite skincare brand this year. I’ve always known about this line, but it wasn’t until recent recommendations (and an Ulta sale) that I decided to take the plunge. I’ve never been a believer in buying any facial treatments that are more than $10. But I’ve realized that your skin is important and you should probably take care of it. Sure, this line might not be as cheap as what you can find at your local drugstore, but that won’t matter when you use them and you’re skin instantly turns into that of an angel. In comparison to other high-end lines, these products are reasonably priced and worth the extra cash because they’re extremely effective. I mean, I have yet to find an acne cream as magical as the Mario Badescu Drying Lotion. And don’t even get me started on their Facial Spray that’s made with aloe, herbs, and rose water (who doesn’t’ want their face to feel soothed AND smell like a bouquet?).

Photography by Kelsey Baska

Age of Athleisure

11.23.2015

By Hannah Pierangelo

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KU Fit Instructor leads a relaxing yoga class at the Ambler Recreation Center.

Among the rows of ellipticals, treadmills, and weight machines at Ambler Rec, fashionable gym wear strikes. Strappy-back sport bras, vividly patterned leggings, sleek-and-shaping yoga pants, and, of course, a sea of sneakers in every color combination imaginable.

Fashion meets athleticism, it seems, in a fast growing trend that’s sweeping the nation. According the global information company The NPD Group, US consumers spent more than $300 billion in the active wear industry last year. With the market expanding in a such a huge way, it’s not hard to see why an increasing number of companies are eager to jump in.

Stores like Forever 21, Gap, Free People, and H&M are among a few fashionable clothing stores that have joined the trend and added lines of active wear. In fact, H&M’s collaboration with Alexander Wang last year for sporty, stylish active wear and casual apparel was massively popular and sold out almost immediately.

The Business of Fashion guesses that the trend for wearing gym clothes beyond the gym most likely spurred from 80s aerobics culture, when sweatbands, legwarmers, and leotards were fashionable in every day outfits. Now, the trend has turned to yoga pants, athletic shorts, and stylish sneakers.

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For many, it’s comfort that reigns above all. Functionality still matters, and the added fashion is just a bonus.

“I typically wear athletic clothes on campus and while I am lounging because it is comfortable to me and looks better than wearing a big t-shirt and shorts,” says Lanie Leek, a senior journalism major. “It’s easy to wear in any weather. I am able to layer and sometimes I still feel like I have a sense of style while wearing workout clothes.”

Leek says she prefers to wear Gap athletic clothes because of their cost, but also wears Lululemon for its high quality clothing, despite the price tag. Her favorite item is a green Lululemon tank top that she wears all year long.

“I like to express my style with gym wear by pairing fun patterns together and wearing bright color in the summer and darker colors in the winter,” Leek says.

Since gym wear has suddenly gained a sense of style, it’s not uncommon for athletic clothing to be worn casually, too. It’s becoming increasingly popular to wear gym wear everywhere. Yoga pants are attending brunch with friends and fashionable sports bras are dressing up casual street style. While this is nothing new on campus (we’re all too aware of the important role Nike sneakers and leggings play in college day-to-day style), it’s also a hot trend with other demographics.

Dawn Dowers, 46, is a competitive bodybuilder from Wichita, Kansas, and also a health and wellness coach with Isagenix.

“I like to wear stylish athletic wear to the gym, but first and foremost, fit and function have to come first,” says Dowers. There are a lot of times I’m in my gym clothes almost all day long.”

Dowers estimates 90 percent of her gym clothes are Lululemon, and the rest are either Nike, Under Armor, and Victoria’s Secret.

“The reason is they simply hold up. Yes, you may pay more initially, but in the long run, it saves me money because they wear the best,” she says.

For Dowers, stylish and functional gym wear matter beyond comfort. They’re part of her job. “I take all of my gym clothes and have them branded with my company’s logo,” she explains. “Since my business is in the Health & Wellness Arena, I do not walk into a gym without being branded. That also plays into why I’m very aware of how my attire looks. If I look like I just threw something on this morning, it’s not going to make a very good impression for my business.”

From work to play, and everything in between in the day, gym clothes seem to fit almost any situation. According to The Huffington Post, we’re now living in the Age of Athleisure.

Marshal Cohen, chief industry analyst at The NDP Group, says, “Casual and ‘athleisure’ have taken on a life of their own. This is no longer a trend—it is now a lifestyle that is too comfortable, for consumers of all ages, for it to go away anytime soon.”

Photos by Hannah Pierangelo

Bring on the Braid

10.16.2015

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We’re all too familiar with the man-bun trend that’s been taking over lately. But who needs buns when you can do braids?

Men with short hair can opt for small french braids to accent their stylish cuts or pull longer hair out of the way. Of course, long hair looks great with a braid too. We grabbed some handsome gentlemen to be our models, and styled their hair into one of our favorite new trends—the man braid.

Before

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Colin Murphy / Aerospace Engineering

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Austin Hofmann / Computer Science

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Jared Bohaty / Mechanical Engineering

After

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How do you feel about the man braid?

Austin: “I think man braids are interesting. I think people have always connected braids, and pretty much any “more-than-just-gel” hairstyle, with a feminine connotation, so seeing this rise in popularity is entirely inviting for a whole new demographic. I love it.”

Colin: “As an idea, I’m intrigued. Looking at it on hair models, it isn’t bad, but I’m definitely a skeptic to how long this will hold out.”

Jared: “It’s an odd style. I don’t know why men wore it hundreds of years ago and I’m not sure why we’re starting to now.”

Did you like how it turned out for you? Is this a style you might consider trying for casual, day-to-day wear?

Austin: “I only got to briefly see. I enjoyed the new look and it gave me ideas. I probably wouldn’t wear the hairstyles daily, but I am inspired to recreate it.”

Colin: “Honestly, I wasn’t a huge fan. Maybe if my hair was longer to do different styles, or something more subtle, but right now I’m definitely not sold on this becoming the next big style. For me, It seemed like a lot of effort for casual use, and a little flashy for my tastes.”

Jared: “It looks kind of neat but my hair is way too short to do anything fancy with it. I won’t be wearing a man braid any time soon because I prefer to keep my hair short. Plus, it seemed like a lot of work for another person to do, so I can’t imagine doing it myself.”

Do you think this a passing trend, or do you see it having some longevity in the future? Keep in mind that man-buns seem to have stuck.

Austin: “I think it’ll be one of those ‘why didn’t we think of this earlier?’ [moments]. Without being political, I think people finally integrating non-traditional practices opened the floodgates for new hairstyles.”

Colin: “It seems like this trend is a flashy imitation of the man-bun without as much substance. Part of what makes the man-bun work is how effortless and easy it is, but the braid is flashy, and a lot of work. Braids that imitate current hair trends, like an undercut french braid or a man-braid bun might gain some fleeting popularity, but as a whole, I would pin this as something that we’ll be over in a matter of months.”

Jared: “I think this will be more of a passing trend than the bun. The bun seems pretty easy to do, but having to braid your hair daily looks like it would get really tedious really fast.”

Styled by Emma Creighton

Photos by Ikeadi Ndukwu

Dressing to impress: a how to guide for landing the job

4.20.2015

By Ashleigh Lee

It’s the night before a big interview and you are getting everything in order for tomorrow. Your resume is polished and printed. Your alarm is set, even though you won’t be able to sleep a wink. The only thing left to do is to figure out what to wear. You check the email again for the dress code– business casual. What does that even mean?

Kelsey Ploeger an assistant director at the University Career Center helps students with mock interviews, resumes and topical workshops. Ploeger helps break the differences between business professional and business casual. “Business professional is most normal for interviews, unless indicated otherwise,” Ploeger says. “Usually for women it’s plain colors, a blazer, pants, skirt and a blouse, and for men it’s nice slacks and a blazer.”

Business casual is less common, but allows for adding more personality to the outfit. “Here women can wear a casual dress or skirt without a blazer but maybe a cardigan or a sweater,” Ploeger says. “Men can wear slacks and a sweater as well.”

Ashley DeMond, a recruiter for Netsmart Technologies, recommends not being too bold in your clothing choices. “It’s more important to let your personality come out when you answer the questions during the interview than in the way that you dress,” DeMond says.

She says that it’s better to err on the conservative side and to always look sharp. “A lot of times people will come in and their shirts will be wrinkly or the shoes look worn,” she says.

One piece of advice that DeMond offers is to be comfortable in what you do end up wearing. You will appear more confident and know what exactly what you will feel good in.

Caitlin Uyemura, a senior in chemical engineering from Osage City, will begin working at Chevron Phillips Chemical in Houston after graduation as a stream process engineer.

“Engineering is pretty boring,” Uyemura says. “It’s usually frowned upon to be out the box.”

Uyemura interviewed for a summer internship at Chevron and kept her outfit simple. “For that interview I kept it pretty basic in business formal,” Uyemura says. “I wore dress pants, a blouse and low pumps.”

Uyemura’s advice to anyone going up for a big interview is to be overdressed than to be underdressed.

“More likely than not, a company is not going to not hire you for being overdressed,” she says.

Except maybe if you’re interviewing at Google. Kendal Harland a senior in computer science from Olathe, will be working for Google as a software engineer after graduation. He says that the recruiters told him specifically not to dress up for the interview.

“There were no specific requirements on what I couldn’t wear, as long as I just didn’t show up looking like a bum,” Harland says.

Start up and tech companies are usually very causal and do not require employees to dress up while interviewing or even while working. Most employees can be seen wearing graphic tees and shorts or jeans.

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“For my interview I wore some nice brown boots and a button up shirt,” Harland says.

Harland recommends that people research what you should wear to the interview and the company by doing a Google search or talk to someone who already works there. He said that he saw what everyone was wearing when he visited.

“I think the only reason why I didn’t wear a suit and tie was because I looked at what people wore to those types of interviews,” he says. “It never hurts to do a bit of research.”

If you need help with your resume or searching for a job, contact The University Career Center http://career.ku.edu/appointments or call 785-864-3624.

From KU to KC: Girl Friday, Fabric, & Fashion

3.11.2015

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Photos and story by Aleah Milliner

Located at the historic Katz Drugstore building on the corner of Westport Road in Kansas City, vintage enthusiasts and design duo Lyndsey Helling and Lauren Tweedie spend their time dreaming up ideas and inspiration for their clothing line, Girl Friday.

They occupy two spaces out of the studio, a shared building for artists in the community, and have filled the walls with sketches, chalkboard wall quotes – “selling feelings from wall to ceiling “ – fabric samples, magazine cutouts (including a photo of delicious looking doughnuts), and various other materials. Silver and gold tinsel hang from the walls, and their hand painted fabric scraps are tucked away in a corner.

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Upon walking into their space, you get a sense strong sense of creativity and a fun, unique style that translates into Helling and Tweedie’s various clothing collections.

The girls met while working at Donna’s Dress Shop, a vintage clothing shop in Kansas City, MO. They worked together every Friday and bonded over their mutual interests in art and design, and especially of vintage clothing.

“The shapes are really striking. It is so much more unique than modern clothing. Vintage style is really unafraid,” said Tweedie, on why she gravitates toward the style.

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The pair began designing their line in their free time outside of their work at Donna’s. All of their clothing design has been a collaborative effort between the two, stemming from sketches and inspiration in the studio, and resulting in many hours and late nights of sewing.

Girl Friday debuted in June 2014 with a collection of shift dresses, circle skirts, and tunics, all constructed from vintage fabrics. They debuted their third line in September 2014, a dress collection using hand painted fabric, which included an eyeball-patterned dress.

Screenprinting was not an option for their designs, so they turned to hand painting.

“For the eyeball dress we painted yards at a time. Like a football field length of fabric. We just paint all of it, cut it up and assembled it. We wash all of the fabric first, paint it with textile pigment, let it dry, and then heat set the fabric. It is a very time consuming process,” said Tweedie, who worked with textiles in the Art and Design School while attending KU.

Both girls agree that they have grown creatively through designing Girl Friday.

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“I have gotten more confident. I don’t have the best sewing skills but I have learned a lot through this whole process. I jump at making the clothes instead of being hesitant about it,” said Helling.

Helling credits Finnish textile and fashion design company Marimekko as a major influence in her creativity. While her husband was conducting research in Finland, Helling had a lot of free time to explore, and there she discovered the company.

“I have this really amazing Marrimeko book that is so good and so inspiring. It talks about the company’s history, how it started, and how it evolved. I look at that book often for inspiration.”

As for Tweedie, she sparks her creativity through shopping, wandering through antique malls, and visiting The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City. She also credits Instagram as a source of inspiration.

Helling and Tweedie are currently spending their time in the studio creating their new line.

The line will be a collection of 1970s Sportswear and will debut at the 18th Street Fashion show in Kansas City June 13th, an event open to the public.

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“We have a friend who can really rock a jumpsuit. We wanted to make a jumpsuit with a hood on it, and we designed it around her,” said Helling.

The newest Girl Friday line will include bold, graphic prints and their first men’s outfit. The collection will be for sale immediately after, however only five outfits will be created.

Looking to the future, the girls hope to be designing full time for Girl Friday and to sell their clothes in as many retail stores as possible.

“I feel honored when anyone expresses interest,” Tweedie said.

Edited by Katie Gilbaugh

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