Entries Tagged as 'Trends'

4 Tips for Reinvigorating Your Closet on a Budget

11.06.2018

By Miranda Dorsey

When it comes to clothing, I have often been told that I have expensive taste. And I’ll be honest, this has gotten me in trouble in the past.  However, if you follow these tips, you’ll find that you have more money to spend and more clothing in your closet.

  1. Shop “New” Items… And Then Wait.

Even though I’m a huge fan of shopping the “new” section of every store, or spending hours sorting through all of the different categories that every clothing website has to offer, I know that this is one of the worst ways to find deals.  Because why would a company put something new to their store on sale if they don’t know how popular the item will be yet? Instead, I’ve started to shop for new items, just as I always would, and then wait for them to go on sale. My Google Chrome account contains an entire folder for clothing items I’m waiting to go on sale. It sounds like something obvious, but it’s been a game changer for me.  

2. Check out the Clearance or Sale Section.

On top of waiting for my favorite items to go on sale, make sure you always check out the sale/clearance section of any website. I’ve noticed that they don’t always list sale/clearance items in the regular sections of the site, so it’s important that you check both sections just in case.  This way, you’re saving money while still finding adorable items to add to your wardrobe.

3. Don’t Fall for Gimmicks Designed to Get You to Buy.

I’ll be the first person to admit that I’m a sucker for sales. Whenever I get an email from a company proclaiming that this is it – the biggest event to ever happen – I can’t help myself. It’s not easy, but developing self-control is key when it comes to saving money on clothing from higher end brands. Another common gimmick is the “Only ‘x’ Items Left!” line. This line has been my enemy for quite some time, because who wants to miss out?  I sure don’t. And of course, if I don’t order the limited availability item right now, right this second, someone is going to come along and do it for me. But this is exactly what they want you to think. Don’t give in to this gimmick just because it seems like an item is going fast. Instead, monitor the item to see how fast it’s actually selling. In most cases, an item that is not for sale with just a few left will be safe to wait to purchase.  

4. If an Item Sells Out, Poshmark is Your Best Friend.

One of my favorite websites of all time is Poshmark. The premise is simple enough. You list the old clothing that you don’t want anymore, and someone finds it and buys it. It’s eBay exclusively for clothes. However, unlike thrifting, it’s easier to search and tailor the website to exactly what you’re looking to buy. I’ve found so many amazing designer pieces in new or like-new condition listed for much less than the sticker price. For example, I bought one of my favorite Gal Meets Glam dresses for about 70% off the original listing price. You can even save searches in your browser and go back later to check for more products that have been newly listed, which is something I do for some of my favorite brands.

Chicer than you think: a beginner’s guide to platform sneakers

9.19.2018

By Rebekah Swank

Gone are the days of butterfly clips, purple glitter lip gloss and gaucho pants…or are they? There’s a new trend making all of our suppressed Spice Girls dreams come true, and it’s one people pretend to hate: the “ugly” platform sneaker. You might have heard them called “Dad shoes,” “space-age trainers,” “chunky commuters,” the list of nicknames and insults goes on.

You’ve probably seen this style on Instagram more than you have in real life, and that’s because most people are terrified of these monstrously bold shoes. This trend hasn’t been adopted and embraced by Instagram famous teens and sorority girls. These shoes make a statement. They aren’t for the faint of heart. And they’re expensive AF. (I don’t know about you all, but I don’t have $895 for a pair of Balenciaga Colorblocked Washed Triple Sneakers.) That’s all valid rationale for leaving this trend behind.

However you feel about these shoes, you can’t deny their versatility. These sneakers can be paired with high-waisted mom jeans and a blazer for coffee with your pals, or a midi dress for a day at the office. The fashion world has been making a transition to more comfortable styles with the introduction of athleisure and athluxury markets, so this trend is here to stay.

If you’re looking to explore this trend or increase the number of statement pieces in your closet, here are some semi-affordable options to start your sky-high sneaker collection.

Disruptor II Premium Sneaker, $64.99

This is the perfect platform to ease you into this trend. C’mon, dip your toe in the water with some good old FILA Distributors.

 

Nike Air Max 95 SE Glitter, $170

Hello? It’s the shoes you would have killed for in second grade. They want to chat with you.

 

Thick Soled Sneakers, $69.90

Unsurprisingly, Zara is on top of this trend, handing us something stylish and inexpensive. We don’t deserve you, Z.

 

Ciara Chunky Trainers, $65

Lisa Frank meets sneakers in these metallic works of art. I have a feeling Sporty Spice would give these shoes two thumbs up.

 

ASOS DESIGN Denial Chunky Sneakers, $72

With these leopard print babies on your feet, there’s no telling how much fun you’ll have.

 

Steve Madden Current Leather Sneaker, $103

These sneakers give you the best of both worlds with a subtle print and a pop of color.

Makeup and the Fall Pantone Fashion Color Report Of 2017

11.02.2017

Words and photos by Emma Creighton

Although fashion celebrates individuality, it is an industry dominated by major players who influence what every single person wears on a daily basis. These players include fashion designers, pop icons, and even cities. These cities are known for their own distinct looks and play a unique role in the world of fashion. New York and London are two of these major players. There is a running joke that everyone in New York wears all black. In contrast, London is known for its eccentricity and borderline haute couture street style. Although very different, both cities help to shape modern fashion. Trends and color palettes are put into place seasons in advance and are modeled after the trends seen in these cities. The Pantone color palette is no different. Pantone color palettes are designed to encapsulate the hottest tones for a particular season so that designers, advertisers, artists and everyone else in the fashion industry can work cohesively.

(Top) New York, (Bottom) London

Beauty – makeup and hair – are major elements in the realm of fashion. Often times makeup and hair design can make or break a runway or editorial. Sometimes, it is the focus of an editorial. Here at Style on the Hill we tried our hand at a makeup editorial inspired by the Fall 2017 Pantone palettes. Here are the shades for this fall season!

You’re probably thinking, ”What is so special about these colors? They look like every other ’fall’ color ever.” You’re not wrong, but these particular shades have been formulaically selected by the Pantone Color Institute specifically for the 2017 fall season based on designs shown at New York Fashion week. This process happens every season, months ahead of time. But, there’s something unique to this year that has never happened before.

The teams at PCI analyzed trends  from the London fashion week and put them into consideration during its color selection process. Usually, the United States based company only bases their fashion palette on New York, but London has become so influential in American fashion that the company decided to put together an additional palette based off their designers. The Executive Director of the Pantone Institute, Leatrice Eiseman, was quoted on Pantone’s website, saying “There is a commonality between the colors we are seeing on the runway in New York and London. However, individuality is evident and we are seeing a distinct difference between the shows in the two cities in the way these same colors are being combined.” It will be interesting to see how the Western world continues to fuse on the fashion front. Who knows, New York may just get the eccentric London look!

A Man’s Rights

7.27.2017

By Logan Gossett

 

After losing a house, two jobs and $16,000 in court expenses, Phil – whose name has been changed to protect his anonymity – humbly received his ambitious reward: his son, for five hours, once a month.

        Five days ago he paid a monthly fee of $600 still owed from the home’s mortgage, a fee he will continue to pay until 2027 when his son will be 15 years old. Phil now pays more in child support than he earns from unemployment checks.

“My son was about four inches taller when I finally got to see him,” Phil said. “His mom told him not to tell me what his favorite color is, but I think it’s green. She also told him not to tell me his favorite superhero, but he let that one slip: Batman,” he said. He just hopes to be a close second one day.

Men’s rights advocacy was partly catalyzed by stories like Phil’s. Through forums like MensActivism, A Voice for Men and Reddit’s Men’s Rights board, men’s rights advocacy attempts to provide support and resources for fathers with similar struggles. However, their outreach is inhibited by their designation as misogynist hate groups by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC). The SPLC describes the men’s rights movement as “savaging feminists,” and cites the website manboobz.com as a useful watchdog of the men’s rights movement.

Male mortality rates paint the grisly picture that illustrates the story behind the men’s rights movement.

Advocates see that men are five times more likely to commit suicide than women; that men are twenty times more likely to die in the workplace; that men are four times more likely to be the victims of homicide. Men’s rights advocates see disproportionate workplace deaths and question the existence of disproportionate privilege.

Annie McBride, Assistant Director for the Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equity, suggests that male privilege is not an easily measurable commodity.

“Privileges are things that [men] were born into, not that they’ve had to earn,” she said. “The ability to, as a white person, walk around department stores and not feel people’s eyes on you and be followed. I didn’t do anything to earn that privilege. It was just something I was born into.”

McBride agreed that male mortality and men’s mental well-being is concerning. She argued that toxic masculinity stigmatizes the male pursuit of mental health treatment, something feminism seeks to rectify.

Many scholars believe that the men’s rights movement is simply a backlash to feminism and the progress it has attained for women. Megan Williams, Program Coordinator for the Emily Taylor Center, agreed.

“[Men’s rights advocates] use the language of civil rights to undercut actual inequity,” she said. “It’s really just a reflection of men who are seeing their privilege challenged; seeing the entitlement that they’ve had challenged and thinking that that is oppression or discrimination.”

Men and indebted fathers struggle to reconcile their alarmingly higher rates of experiencing homelessness and being victims of homicide as challenged privileges. Men posting on MensActivism and A Voice for Men often resist the implication that the right to a home and life are privileges to be challenged.

Like McBride, Williams viewed feminism as a solution for the issues central to men’s rights advocates.

“If we’re talking about liberation of men, then that is a feminist project. If we’re talking about a real men’s rights movement, it’s feminism,” Williams said. 

The most urgent men’s rights topic for fathers, however, is the low likelihood of fathers being granted primary guardian custody of their child after a divorce. Custody is six times more likely to be obtained by the mother.

Phil doesn’t identify as an advocate for men’s rights or women’s rights: just a father, if only for five hours a month.

Phil was deployed to work on oil rigs for nine months per year. After four months of working rigs in Saudi Arabian waters, he returned to his home in the deep south to find it empty.

“Everything was gone. Furniture, TVs, kitchen stuff — you name it, it was gone,” Phil said. But, while furniture is replaceable, family is not.

“My heart sank when I knew what she did. All I thought of for months was seeing my wife and kid; maybe watching a movie or something,” Nease said. “Now I don’t even have a TV.”

Phil was the sole working parent while married. While he was on oil rigs, his wife was at home serving as their son’s primary caregiver. According to KU Law Associate Professor Melanie DeRousse, parental roles like those held by Phil and his ex-wife while married limit the outcomes of custody battles.

“Most of the time moms are doing that primary caregiving. The judge wants to maintain that stability for the kids so the kid has access to that attached parent. They’re going to maintain some of that gender disparity that was existing in the relationship into their orders. They’re looking at what will not disrupt the kid’s lives, not some parent’s rights,” DeRousse said.

If the mother serves as the child’s primary caregiver while the father is only parenting during the weekends, the judge will grant joint custody with the father having the kid for the weekend, while the mother maintains the child during the week. Extended periods away from his son while working hurt Phil’s chances of attaining equal joint custody.

Melanie DeRousse said that, while some judges may assume that the kid is better off with his/her mother, “more often than not you have the parties trying to figure out what form of joint custody is going to work for the kid.” DeRousse added that, “Most psychologists would agree with the legislature: joint custody is preferred for the kid.”

As traditional gender roles continue to undergo egalitarian permutations, fathers will begin to attain equal joint custody more frequently. Male mortality rates and mental health still present an issue, however, and men’s rights advocates and feminists view their respective movements as the optimal solution.

A Voice for Men founder Paul Elam argues that feminists preach equality while pursuing favoritism. Annie McBride, Megan Williams and most self-identified feminists disagree, instead viewing feminism as a potential solution for men’s rights issues and equity for all genders.

Both men’s rights advocates and feminists will continue to pursue their ideal of gender equity. Both men’s rights advocates and feminists will continue to provide assistance to men or women suffering through mental illnesses or unforgiving workplaces.

Meanwhile, Phil will be eagerly anticipating his next visitation with his son.

“[My son] likes the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, so I bought him some action figures and Ninja Turtle shirts — stuff like that. Hopefully he likes them; I just wanna see him happy.”

 

Stick and Poke

4.12.2017

 

By Melissa Yunk

17200413_10211470912155786_1984452743_o

“You do not want to poke too far to make yourself bleed but far enough to hear an audible “pop” when you pull the needle out.”

Rachel Bennett, a senior from Basehor, cringes at her friend’s words, but continues to wrap her sewing needle with some thread. She finishes sketching a small tree on her wrist, dips the needle in the bright green ink and gets to work. Stick. Pop. Stick. Pop.

IMG_4370

Bennett and her friend are giving each other stick and poke tattoos in her friend’s attic, surrounded by burning sage, discussing witchcraft.

“I was not initially planning on giving myself a tattoo, but I like to think of myself as a spontaneous person so it didn’t take much to change my mind,” Bennett says.

Stick and poke, or DIY tattoos are not a new trend—they’re common in jail cells across the nation—but they are the latest thing in tattoos among young adults and on college campuses.

A simple Google search makes it clear how much of a trend this is. In a matter of seconds, you’ll find quirky how-to videos, endless tattoo ideas on Pinterest and Instagram, and even DIY kits in stores such as Etsy and Amazon.

But you don’t need a kit—it’s possible to do at-home tattoos using common household products. All you need is a sewing needle, some thread and ink.

Caroline Roe, a sophomore with eight stick and pokes, has perfected the process. After cleaning and shaving the area of the tattoo, she does a rough sketch of her design idea. She then sticks the needle in the eraser of a pencil and wraps the thread around the sharp end of the needle to hold the ink.  After putting together her tool, either she or a friend continuously pokes over the sketch until it is finished.

A small stick and poke can take around two hours, approximately four times as long as a traditional tattoo. They also fade faster than professional tattoos and tend to hurt more. Roe says the consistent speed of a tattoo gun needle often helps numb the pain after a few moments. However, when tattooing yourself, the inconsistent speed and depth of the poke makes pain constant and more intense.

Roe also has a few traditional tattoos, but likes the DIY method because of the extremely low cost—practically free—and artistic freedom. “Sure, parlors might be more clean and it is nice supporting artists,” Roe says. “But I really like the spontaneity of stick and pokes and being able to have full control of the designs.”

However, sacrificing the cleanliness of a tattoo parlors is not such a good idea. Kim Ens, director of clinic services for the Douglas County Health Department, talked about the risk of acquiring infections such as Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C and even HIV when using unprofessionally sanitized needles. The only way to guarantee a needle is sterile, she says, is to use a brand new one. Bennett sterilized her needle by running it under a flame and wiping it with rubbing alcohol.

17200589_10211470912515795_1817366035_o

“It may not have been smart,” Bennett says. “But it was something.”

Ens added that ink that is not diluted or meant for tattoos can also lead to variety of infections or allergic reactions, so it is important to use the correct ink. “Overall, my opinion is to not do it to yourself,” Ens says.

Despite these concerns, there is still appeal behind stick and poke tattoos, whether it be the elongated adrenaline rush, the comfort of doing it in your own home, or the gritty appearance both girls spoke of.

“I feel brave and accomplished after finishing,” Bennett says. “Sure, slightly endangered but the feeling of doing it and being proud of something I made is worth it.”

    Older Entries »