Entries Tagged as 'Style on the Hill'

An Ode to the 90s

10.31.2017

 

By Karsan Turner

Kramer speeds out of Jerry Seinfeld’s apartment saying “Man, it’s the 90’s; it’s hammer time!” Now, 20 years later, the 90’s is being hit with a hammer. It’s crazy, the incoming freshman at KU are the last group of students born in the 90’s. As the last generation of 90’s kids enter, we see the passing of yet another decade. So we’ve gathered here today to remember the passing of a once great decade that shaped the culture we live in today, so sit back and relax as we hammer time one last time.

Of course we can’t go back to the 90’s unless we dress the part (this is a fashion blog after all.) No 90’s kid was seen leaving the house without their classic 90’s sillybands. Sillybands (for the children of today who were born in 2000) were basically rubber bands that took the shape of animals.

Now that we’ve fit into our fashionable clothes, it’s time to remember the art and media of the time. 90’s movies were special because they made you think critically (unlike the watered down movies of the 2000’s). 90’s classics like Memento made viewers question the validity of their life vs a 2010’s film about talking Lego’s. Man, remember when films used to be smart?

Another classic 90’s film is “Spider-Man,” directed by 90’s legend Sam Raimi. The film is argued to be somewhat dated due to the limited technology from about 25 years ago, but there’s nothing more 90’s than the scene where Spider-Man runs in front of an American flag as he swings into New York City. As we all know, the American Flag stopped existing after 1999 but this trilogy will serve as a memorial for the flag.

The 90’s were a time of great fashion, films and innovation. The 90’s events improved because we received our information with the power of the brand new (at the time) internet. Thanks to Mark Zuckerberg’s Facebook, the 90’s became the first decade to be easily documented.

As 2017 passes, so do the memories of the 90’s, even though you will be gone you definitely will not be forgotten. 90’s, we’ll sure miss you.

SZA Brings Timeless Authenticity to Kansas City

9.08.2017

By Rebekah Swank

 

The Uptown Theater is an old-school concert venue with vintage vibes. The bright-shining bulbs spelling out “Uptown” lit the sign below –“SZA” was illuminated. Kansas City natives and visitors began lining up outside of the theater as early as 4:30 p.m. Fans dressed in true, fabulous SZA fashion while wrapping around the corner and down the street. I saw tight, full-body sequin jumpsuits; oversized jackets, Adidas sweatpants paired with bikini tops, and voluminous, curly hair.

Walking into the concert hall, I was overwhelmed with a skunky scent. White clouds of smoke were scattered throughout the crowd. As the curtains opened and people screamed, giant neon letters spelling “CTRL” gleamed over the heads in front of me. SZA emerged in loose, purple, metallic pants and a black tank top; her long red hair billowed behind her with every step she took.

SZA’s real name is Solána Imani Rowe. She got the inspiration for her stage name from the Supreme Alphabet and the rapper RZA. S stands for “sovereign,” Z stands for “zig-zag,” and A stands for “Allah, the most high.” SZA was raised as an Orthodox Muslim, and still practices Islam, and relies on her faith to stay true to herself and her music.

Mitch Saffle, a student at Kansas State University, admires SZA for being honest in her album newest album, CTRL.

“[The album] was a story of her life. She was being open and honest with her listeners, and because of that I realized I related to some of her struggles regarding relationships and self-worth. SZA is truly an inspirational artist,” Saffle said.

SZA’s connection to her fans is unique to her and her performances. When she sang and danced, I could see her radiating with happiness as more and more of her followers sang along with her.

“SZA was an amazing performer, and I really appreciated her interaction with the crowd, asking how we were doing ‘physically, mentally, and spiritually,’” Saffle said. “To me it seemed that she was just a genuine person doing what she loved.”

Although her show seemed short, SZA’s performance was energetic and authentic. From her opening song of “Supermodel,” when the crowd screeched with excitement, to her finale singing “Twenty Something,” she twirled around the stage and bellowed her lyrics with fervor.

I have listened to SZA since I was a senior in high school. I have trolled through her Instagram and Twitter accounts. I have tried to recreate some of her greatest looks with very little success. She is truly a one of a kind musical artist, and after seeing her on stage, all I can say is “Go Gina.”

A Man’s Rights

7.27.2017

By Logan Gossett

 

After losing a house, two jobs and $16,000 in court expenses, Phil – whose name has been changed to protect his anonymity – humbly received his ambitious reward: his son, for five hours, once a month.

        Five days ago he paid a monthly fee of $600 still owed from the home’s mortgage, a fee he will continue to pay until 2027 when his son will be 15 years old. Phil now pays more in child support than he earns from unemployment checks.

“My son was about four inches taller when I finally got to see him,” Phil said. “His mom told him not to tell me what his favorite color is, but I think it’s green. She also told him not to tell me his favorite superhero, but he let that one slip: Batman,” he said. He just hopes to be a close second one day.

Men’s rights advocacy was partly catalyzed by stories like Phil’s. Through forums like MensActivism, A Voice for Men and Reddit’s Men’s Rights board, men’s rights advocacy attempts to provide support and resources for fathers with similar struggles. However, their outreach is inhibited by their designation as misogynist hate groups by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC). The SPLC describes the men’s rights movement as “savaging feminists,” and cites the website manboobz.com as a useful watchdog of the men’s rights movement.

Male mortality rates paint the grisly picture that illustrates the story behind the men’s rights movement.

Advocates see that men are five times more likely to commit suicide than women; that men are twenty times more likely to die in the workplace; that men are four times more likely to be the victims of homicide. Men’s rights advocates see disproportionate workplace deaths and question the existence of disproportionate privilege.

Annie McBride, Assistant Director for the Emily Taylor Center for Women & Gender Equity, suggests that male privilege is not an easily measurable commodity.

“Privileges are things that [men] were born into, not that they’ve had to earn,” she said. “The ability to, as a white person, walk around department stores and not feel people’s eyes on you and be followed. I didn’t do anything to earn that privilege. It was just something I was born into.”

McBride agreed that male mortality and men’s mental well-being is concerning. She argued that toxic masculinity stigmatizes the male pursuit of mental health treatment, something feminism seeks to rectify.

Many scholars believe that the men’s rights movement is simply a backlash to feminism and the progress it has attained for women. Megan Williams, Program Coordinator for the Emily Taylor Center, agreed.

“[Men’s rights advocates] use the language of civil rights to undercut actual inequity,” she said. “It’s really just a reflection of men who are seeing their privilege challenged; seeing the entitlement that they’ve had challenged and thinking that that is oppression or discrimination.”

Men and indebted fathers struggle to reconcile their alarmingly higher rates of experiencing homelessness and being victims of homicide as challenged privileges. Men posting on MensActivism and A Voice for Men often resist the implication that the right to a home and life are privileges to be challenged.

Like McBride, Williams viewed feminism as a solution for the issues central to men’s rights advocates.

“If we’re talking about liberation of men, then that is a feminist project. If we’re talking about a real men’s rights movement, it’s feminism,” Williams said. 

The most urgent men’s rights topic for fathers, however, is the low likelihood of fathers being granted primary guardian custody of their child after a divorce. Custody is six times more likely to be obtained by the mother.

Phil doesn’t identify as an advocate for men’s rights or women’s rights: just a father, if only for five hours a month.

Phil was deployed to work on oil rigs for nine months per year. After four months of working rigs in Saudi Arabian waters, he returned to his home in the deep south to find it empty.

“Everything was gone. Furniture, TVs, kitchen stuff — you name it, it was gone,” Phil said. But, while furniture is replaceable, family is not.

“My heart sank when I knew what she did. All I thought of for months was seeing my wife and kid; maybe watching a movie or something,” Nease said. “Now I don’t even have a TV.”

Phil was the sole working parent while married. While he was on oil rigs, his wife was at home serving as their son’s primary caregiver. According to KU Law Associate Professor Melanie DeRousse, parental roles like those held by Phil and his ex-wife while married limit the outcomes of custody battles.

“Most of the time moms are doing that primary caregiving. The judge wants to maintain that stability for the kids so the kid has access to that attached parent. They’re going to maintain some of that gender disparity that was existing in the relationship into their orders. They’re looking at what will not disrupt the kid’s lives, not some parent’s rights,” DeRousse said.

If the mother serves as the child’s primary caregiver while the father is only parenting during the weekends, the judge will grant joint custody with the father having the kid for the weekend, while the mother maintains the child during the week. Extended periods away from his son while working hurt Phil’s chances of attaining equal joint custody.

Melanie DeRousse said that, while some judges may assume that the kid is better off with his/her mother, “more often than not you have the parties trying to figure out what form of joint custody is going to work for the kid.” DeRousse added that, “Most psychologists would agree with the legislature: joint custody is preferred for the kid.”

As traditional gender roles continue to undergo egalitarian permutations, fathers will begin to attain equal joint custody more frequently. Male mortality rates and mental health still present an issue, however, and men’s rights advocates and feminists view their respective movements as the optimal solution.

A Voice for Men founder Paul Elam argues that feminists preach equality while pursuing favoritism. Annie McBride, Megan Williams and most self-identified feminists disagree, instead viewing feminism as a potential solution for men’s rights issues and equity for all genders.

Both men’s rights advocates and feminists will continue to pursue their ideal of gender equity. Both men’s rights advocates and feminists will continue to provide assistance to men or women suffering through mental illnesses or unforgiving workplaces.

Meanwhile, Phil will be eagerly anticipating his next visitation with his son.

“[My son] likes the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, so I bought him some action figures and Ninja Turtle shirts — stuff like that. Hopefully he likes them; I just wanna see him happy.”

 

If Met Gala Celebs Were Your Professors

5.05.2017

By Rebekah Swank

It’s nearly finals week, and by this point in the semester you have a pretty good read on your professors and their personalities. There are good ones, bad ones, and ones that make you want to walk blindly onto Jayhawk Boulevard with the hope of getting hit by a bus. Here they all are as the 2017 Met Gala attendees. Because fashion.

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Lily Collins wearing Giambattista Valli

Lily is the professor you admire because she really has her shit together. She has six degrees, is head of the department and gets your assignment graded within a day of you turning it in. She’s a hard ass, but you respect her for it.

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Lily Aldridge in Ralph Lauren Collection Custom

Lily Aldridge, on the other hand, is the young, hip, fun professor you want to be. She completed her Ph.D. dissertation in Marrakech, and she doesn’t let you forget it. She wears stilettos or boots everywhere she goes, and you hope to one day run into her at a bar.

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Kendall Jenner wearing La Perla Haute Couture and Kim Kardashian wearing Vivienne Westwood

Kendall and Kim are like those TAs you love to hate. They are rude, not helpful and after you ask them a question, you suspect that they are talking about how stupid they think you are. When they are subbing the professor and realize no one has completed the assigned readings, they promise not to tattle on the class, but then they tell the professor and get the entire class a pop quiz.

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Rihanna wearing Comme des Garçons

Rihanna is the professor we all want to have. She doesn’t take attendance, curves every test, cancels class on a semi-regular basis and doesn’t require students to take a final. She curses, and she admits when she is hungover. She is beauty and grace. She is a queen.

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Joe Jonas wearing Elizabeth Kennedy

Joe is that cute professor you have a crush on. You try to pull a Lindsay Lohan in Mean Girls and dumb yourself down so you have an excuse to talk to him, but he sees right through you.

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Jaden Smith wearing Louis Vuitton

Jaden Smith is that kooky professor who terrifies you. In the middle of his lecture, he says things that are weird, off-putting, gross or a combination of the three. He’s a creepy dude who wonders why he even holds office hours because no one ever comes.

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Zoë Kravitz wearing Oscar de la Renta

Ah, Zoë. She is the older professor you could talk to for hours. She seems to have all the knowledge and wisdom in the world, and you can’t hear enough of it. If you have to talk to her after class, you end up staying for 30 minutes longer than you had planned because you two get swept up in conversation.

The Ultimate Glossier Super Pack Review

4.18.2017

By Rebekah Swank

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I have been using the Super Pack for about three and a half months, and I can say with confidence that Glossier has stolen my heart. When I began this (kind of expensive) venture, my expectations for these three serums were low, but I was still hopeful. My skin was cluttered with small zits and terribly dull, but I think these serums have helped improve both of those problems.

At the beginning of my experiment, I was using Clean & Clear Continuous Control acne cleanser with benzoyl peroxide twice a day. However, a month ago I started using Alba Botanica Good & Clean Toxin Release Scrub, along with St. Ives Blackhead Clearing Green Tea Scrub and Aveeno Positively Radiant brightening cleanser. I’ll use one of the scrubs in the morning, and one at night, and follow each of them with the gentle Aveeno cleanser. I still use the Clean & Clear cleanser with a Clarisonic brush if I fall asleep with makeup on, or if I feel like I need extra exfoliating, but I typically only use it two or three times per week. I believe using products with more natural ingredients in combination with the Super Pack has boosted my results.

What I love most about these serums are the ingredients. Each serum has natural, gentle ingredients that help skin reach its healthiest form. Although my blemishes haven’t vanished completely, I can definitely see a difference in the texture and brightness of my skin.

These serums also go a long way; meaning I’ve been using them for nearly four months and I am only about half-way through each bottle. Because they are so concentrated with magical vitamin goodness, you only need to use three to four drops every day. That makes coughing up $65 plus shipping for these bad boys a little easier.

My favorite serum is Super Pure, which helps with blemishes and irritation. It flushes out impurities from makeup, junk food and alcohol—it’s like a free skin pass to do whatever you want! It feels light and clean on my skin, and I think it’s the Super with the best results.

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The Supers are a great, less expensive starting place for people looking into high quality skin products. They really do take care of your skin. However, I probably won’t purchase all three of them at the same time again. I like Super Pure and Super Bounce way more than Super Glow, so I will most likely buy those separately. I highly recommend the Super Pack; it’s easy to use, easy to incorporate into your routine and feels phenomenal on your skin. Overall, I give it 8.5/10.

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