Butt Why? The Return of the Backside

10.05.2014

By Christine Stanwood

It’s a breezy, 75-degree day outside and I decide it’s the perfect time for a joyride. I roll down my windows and turn on the radio. Jason Derulo is crooning, “You know what to do with that big fat butt,” over the airwaves. Not quite feeling the popular tune, I quickly turn off the radio and focus my attention to the newly yellow leaves on the trees throughout campus. Ah, Jayhawk Boulevard! Free at las—asses, more asses. Yoga pants and high-waisted jean shorts quickly blur my vision. I drive back home and turn on MTV only to find Nicki Minaj twerking in a neon pink thong to her newest hit, “Anaconda.” Face palm, America.

I can’t be the only one crazy to think that this ass obsession is getting out of control. Butt why?

Recent articles in the New York Times and even Vogue are saying that butts are back in style. Having a juicy butt could be comparable to flannel for fall. Patricia Garcia, associate culture editor of Vogue says in an article, “In music videos, in Instagram photos, and on today’s most popular celebrities, the measure of sex appeal is inextricably linked to the prominence of a woman’s behind.”

Here to stay
Being attracted to a big butt isn’t just a fad. David Buss, Ph.D., psychology professor at the University of Texas at Austin discussed the topic in a recent interview for Men’s Health Magazine. He talked about why the attraction of a butt is primal. He states in the article that, “If a woman has a full tush, that’s a signal to your primitive brain that she’s probably carrying enough fat to become pregnant.”

Is it possible that we could credit this recent exposure to, dare I say it, men? We know the age-old trick: men are taught from a young age to hold open the door for women, to not only be polite but to also get a quick peek at her behind. Will Webber, junior at the University of Kansas says that men are helpless to the allure of the big backside.

“We’ve been taught since the stone age to seek out wide birthing hips and start big families with big butts,” Webber said. “Personally, I believe this evolutionary trait is obsolete—much like the presence of wisdom teeth—because I’m not trying to have any kids in the near future.”

If men’s views on butts are shaping pop culture, are women changing their lifestyles to shape their butts? Bianca Fugate, senior at KU doesn’t think so.

“I personally do not focus on my butt when I go to the gym,” she said. “I figure that if I’m working on my body as a whole, my butt will do what it’s supposed to.”

Fugate believes the focus on butts varies from woman to woman.

“Some people like their butts more than anything else on their bodies, so for them showing off their butt makes them feel more confident with themselves,” she said.

However, not all men are on board with this trend. At least in collegiate culture, often times you’ll overhear guys discussing their preference of being a “tits guy” versus an “ass-man.” Collins Uwagba, a senior in the KU Pharmacy school explains that being a “tits guy” can trump the butt trend.

“I like tall slim girls, and that doesn’t really come with them having a big ass,” he said. “A big ass doesn’t really excite or entice me.”

Regardless, we all know that trends are cyclical and next year could easily be the “Return of the Rack” and cleavage could be the new black. But Webber doesn’t think the butt obsession is going away anytime soon.

“I think it’s probably here to stay,” he says. “Or who knows, maybe men will soon come to the realization that girls do, in fact, poop.”

 

Photo by Allie Welch

Edited by Katie Gilbaugh

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